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XploSens P
XploSens P

XploSens P

XploSens TS - Formula
XploSens TS - Formula

XploSens TS - Formula

XploSens SP
XploSens SP

XploSens SP

XPell CE
XPell CE

XPell CE

XploSens OX
XploSens OX

XploSens OX

XploSens PS - Aqueous solvent
XploSens PS - Aqueous solvent

XploSens PS - Aqueous solvent

XploSens TS - Shampoo
XploSens TS - Shampoo

XploSens TS - Shampoo

XploSens R
XploSens R

XploSens R

By Julie Scuderi
Rural State Entrepreneurs Shared Insight into SBIR Funding Process
 
By Steve Paris

OCAST awards $745,000 to three winning applicants in Nanotechnology Application Projects

The Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) has named three successful applicants in the Oklahoma Nanotechnology Applications Project (ONAP). The winning firms will receive $745,000 collectively for research that will be completed within three years.

By Brian Brus

Courtesy of The Journal Record

OKLAHOMA CITY – A last-minute reauthorization of the $2.5 billion federal Small Business Innovation Research program means the difference to companies like XploSafe between dying in their concept phase or being able to grow and add several highly trained employees, Shaikh Shoaib said.

By Copyright © 2011, The Oklahoma Publishing Company

Projects aimed at producing smarter stop lights, improved body armor and better drug delivery systems were among the 11 research tasks awarded nearly $1.9 million on Tuesday by the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST).

By Kelly Green | Research Communications | 405-744-5827 | kelly.green@okstate.edu

 

By Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions

 

By Andy Choi

The scientists at the American Chemical Society (ACS) have come up with a nanomaterial that can be sprayed on surfaces to detect and simultaneously neutralize explosives. This new material was unveiled at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the ACS.

By NIC HALVERSON

 

A new spray-on material that detects and neutralizes explosives commonly used by terrorists could lift government restrictions on liquids carried aboard airliners.

The material is an ink-like substance made of tiny metallic oxide nanoparticles that changes color, from dark blue to pale yellow or clear, in the presence of peroxide-based explosives.

These explosives were used by terrorists in the 2005 London subway bombing and by the thwarted "shoe bomber" who attempted to detonate this substance aboard an airplane in 2001.

By Cameron Chai

A research team at the Oklahoma State University has developed and tested a spray-on material that can identify and make explosives that are carried on aircraft harmless.

The detector and neutralizer that resemble ink were recently unveiled at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), held in Anaheim.

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