Articles

By NIC HALVERSON

 

A new spray-on material that detects and neutralizes explosives commonly used by terrorists could lift government restrictions on liquids carried aboard airliners.

The material is an ink-like substance made of tiny metallic oxide nanoparticles that changes color, from dark blue to pale yellow or clear, in the presence of peroxide-based explosives.

These explosives were used by terrorists in the 2005 London subway bombing and by the thwarted "shoe bomber" who attempted to detonate this substance aboard an airplane in 2001.

By Cameron Chai

A research team at the Oklahoma State University has developed and tested a spray-on material that can identify and make explosives that are carried on aircraft harmless.

The detector and neutralizer that resemble ink were recently unveiled at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), held in Anaheim.

By NIC HALVERSON

 

A new spray-on material that detects and neutralizes explosives commonly used by terrorists could lift government restrictions on liquids carried aboard airliners.

The material is an ink-like substance made of tiny metallic oxide nanoparticles that changes color, from dark blue to pale yellow or clear, in the presence of peroxide-based explosives. These explosives were used by terrorists in the 2005 London subway bombing and by the thwarted "shoe bomber" who attempted to detonate this substance aboard an airplane in 2001.

By PhysOrg.com

New nanomaterial can detect and neutralize explosivesA test strip changes from blue to colorless in the presence of peroxide-based explosives like those favored by terrorists. Credit: Allen Apblett (PhysOrg.com)

 

 

 

 

By R&D Magazine

 

ExplosivesTest1A test strip changes from blue to colorless in the presence of peroxide-based explosives like those favored by terrorists. Credit: Allen Apblett

By Emma Woollacott

It sounds too good to be true - but US scientists have developed a substance that they say can be sprayed onto suspected explosives to detect and completely neutralize them.

By Gadgetry Inc

 

The newest member to the explosives-detecting family doesn't come in the form of another high-tech electronic device that will begin beeping like mad when it happens to chance upon a bomb. No, this one actually comes in a spray bottle and is easy to bring along to the field.

By The Engineer staff

 

A US chemist at Oklahoma State University has developed a spray-on material that detects explosives made from peroxides and renders them harmless.

The material is a type of ink that contains nanoparticles of a compound of molybdenum. The ink changes colour, from dark blue to pale yellow or clear, in the presence of explosives.

By KIT EATON

 

nanotech

 

breakthrough nanotech material has two properties that will appeal to forces facing IED bombers as well as airport security types: It rapidly changes color if exposed to peroxide-based explosives (like the shoe bomber had) and can actually neutralize them too.

By Michael Bernstein, Michael Woods

ANAHEIM, March 31, 2011 — Scientists today described development and successful initial tests of a spray-on material that both detects and renders harmless the genre of terrorist explosives responsible for government restrictions on liquids that can be carried onboard airliners. They reported on the new ink-like explosive detector/neutralizer at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held here this week.

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